Akwaaba So I made this tumblr because I'm Ghanaian, I love Ghana and I miss it there. EVERYTHING GHANA. that means the food, culture,music,dance, clothing, language, everyday life etc. I hope you like my blog. If you don't deal with it boo boo idk where I'm going with this tbh

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Going to Ghana?
f-yeah ghanaians
THEME

alphasandassociates:

deezyville:

officialalltimelow:

*whispers* Its almost hoodie season

Which means stick to well lit and highly populated areas at night if you’re Black.

image

(via owusulovesyou)

121
Shoutout to Africans out there going to college (not that yall have a choice)
More shoutout to Africans doing college courses their parents want not what they want
Shoutout to Africans making their parents proud in anyway shape or form
Shoutout to African kids who are trying their hardest to make their parents proud

11
" School is a tool but learning is a luxury."
- Howie
Instagram: @howietheprince

" School is a tool but learning is a luxury."
- Howie
Instagram: @howietheprince

9
Bespoke shoes Proudly crafted in Ghana by SparkySoles: http://t.co/Yp6F0oKxGo

Bespoke shoes Proudly crafted in Ghana by SparkySoles: http://t.co/Yp6F0oKxGo

32
okokoroko:

The little details. Friends. Photo: Francis Kokoroko 2014 #braids #accra #ghana

okokoroko:

The little details. Friends. Photo: Francis Kokoroko 2014 #braids #accra #ghana

36
kvvesieyipey:

A F R O D I S T R I C T.

@Afrodistrictgh is a men’s lifestyle movement that approaches style & influence from an urban perspective with an afrocentric touch.

Follow the account to see my recent works with the crew.
Enjoy…

Photography by Kvvesi Eyipey • Ghana 
#Iphoneonly #Afrocentric #Ghana #Africa #Lifestyle #Sartorial #Street #Urban #Fashion (at Tema Railway Station)

kvvesieyipey:

A F R O D I S T R I C T.

@Afrodistrictgh is a men’s lifestyle movement that approaches style & influence from an urban perspective with an afrocentric touch.

Follow the account to see my recent works with the crew.
Enjoy…

Photography by Kvvesi Eyipey • Ghana
#Iphoneonly #Afrocentric #Ghana #Africa #Lifestyle #Sartorial #Street #Urban #Fashion (at Tema Railway Station)

660
fckyeahprettyafricans:

Ghanaian twins Ata panin (boy) & Ataa panin (girl) on their naming ceremony 
Ghanaian names are based on ethnic groups including Ga, Akan and Ewenames. Most of them base the given name (first names) they give to their newly born children on the day of the week on which the child has been born with the family name (surname). The Akan and Ewe people of Ghana and ivory coast frequently name their children after the day of the week they were born and the order in which they were born. These names have spread throughout Ghana and Jamaica. The Jamaicans kept their ancestors tradition as a reminder of their African heritage  For example, in Ghana the names follow
Monday
Male: Kwadwo/Kojo/Kobie/jojo
Female: Adwoa/Adzo/Ejo/Ajoba
Tuesday
Male: Kwabena/Kobena/Ebo
Female: Abena/Araba/Abia
Wednesday
Male: Kwaku/kuuku/kweku
Female: Akua/Aku/Ekuwa/kuukuwa/
Thursday
Male: Yaw/Yao/Yokow/Ekow
Female: Yaa/Yaaba/Yaayaa/Aba
Friday
Male: Kofi/Yoofi/Fifi
Female: Afua/Efie/Efua/Afi
Saturday
Male: Kwame/Ato/Atopem/Kwamena
Female: Ama/Awo
Sunday
Male: Kwasi/Akwasi/Siisi
Female: Akosua/Esi/Kisi
The above names also have different spellings and In some cases Ghanaians also go by titles such as 
Ga Tribe
(Girl) Naa = Queen 
(boy) Nii= king
Ashanti tribe
(Girl) Nana = Queen
(boy) Nana= king
Akan tribe
(Girl) Ohemaa= Queen
(Boy) Ohene= king
These titles also have other meanings depending on how they are used.
In Jamaica the following day names have been recorded: Monday, Cudjoe; Tuesday, Cubbenah; Wednesday, Quaco; Thursday, Quao; Friday, Cuffee; Saturday, Quamin; Sunday, Quashee.
The ceremony
After a Ghanaian baby is born he or she is kept indoors for eight days. (The number of days varies through the different tribes) on the eighth day is the day of the naming ceremony, ‘Den to’. The first name received is called the Kra den or “soul name”, and is determined by the day of the week that the child was born. This is because Nyame (oun’-yah-may’) and Nyamewaa (oun’-yah-may’-wah), the Great God and the Great Goddess respectively, whom together constitute the Supreme Being in Ghanaian culture, placed seven of their children over the seven days of the week. The child also receives its formal name or good/ideal name, ‘Den pa’, on the eighth day. The formal name defines the function of the child in the world as it relates to his or her specific Ancestral Clan and his or her potential for manifesting wisdom and influence. The den pa carries the vibrations that will empower the individual to properly incorporate Divine Law and restore Divine balance throughout his or her life according to Ancestral protocol. Traditionally the naming ceremony begins and ends before sunrise. It is the father that has the responsibility of naming the child, thus the family comes together in the early morning at the father’s house. The Elders invoke Nyame (God), Nyamewaa (Goddess), and pour libation to Asaase Afua (Earth Mother/Goddess also called Asaase Yaa) the Abosom (Divinities, Forces of Nature) and the Nananom Nsamanfo (Honoured Ancestral Spirits) to assist with the proper naming of the child. After the name is acquired, the infant is given to an Elder from the father’s side of the family who announces the kra den and den pa to the family for the first time. There are two cups ritually utilized during the ceremony. One cup contains water and the other Nsa (strong drink). The Elder dips his index finger into the water and places it on the mouth of the infant saying, “When you say it is water, it is water.” He dips his index finger into the nsa and places it on the mouth of the infant saying, “When you say it is nsa, it is nsa.” This is repeated three times. This is done to instil within the infant a consciousness of morality-the necessity of always living in harmony with the truth for all of her/his life. After this is completed gifts are presented to the newborn, after which the remainder of the nsa in the bottle is shared with members of the community. The full name of the newborn is spoken to each member of the community, and each member sips some of the nsa as a show of respect for the child and as a gesture towards the newborn’s health. A meal is then shared by all followed by music & dancing – Azonto Style! 

fckyeahprettyafricans:

Ghanaian twins Ata panin (boy) & Ataa panin (girl) on their naming ceremony 

Ghanaian names are based on ethnic groups including GaAkan and Ewenames. Most of them base the given name (first names) they give to their newly born children on the day of the week on which the child has been born with the family name (surname). The Akan and Ewe people of Ghana and ivory coast frequently name their children after the day of the week they were born and the order in which they were born. These names have spread throughout Ghana and Jamaica. The Jamaicans kept their ancestors tradition as a reminder of their African heritage  For example, in Ghana the names follow

Monday

Male: Kwadwo/Kojo/Kobie/jojo

FemaleAdwoa/Adzo/Ejo/Ajoba

Tuesday

Male: Kwabena/Kobena/Ebo

Female: Abena/Araba/Abia

Wednesday

Male: Kwaku/kuuku/kweku

Female: Akua/Aku/Ekuwa/kuukuwa/

Thursday

Male: Yaw/Yao/Yokow/Ekow

Female: Yaa/Yaaba/Yaayaa/Aba

Friday

Male: Kofi/Yoofi/Fifi

Female: Afua/Efie/Efua/Afi

Saturday

Male: Kwame/Ato/Atopem/Kwamena

Female: Ama/Awo

Sunday

Male: Kwasi/Akwasi/Siisi

Female: Akosua/Esi/Kisi

The above names also have different spellings and In some cases Ghanaians also go by titles such as 

Ga Tribe

(Girl) Naa = Queen

(boy) Nii= king

Ashanti tribe

(Girl) Nana = Queen

(boy) Nana= king

Akan tribe

(Girl) Ohemaa= Queen

(Boy) Ohene= king

These titles also have other meanings depending on how they are used.

In Jamaica the following day names have been recorded: Monday, Cudjoe; Tuesday, Cubbenah; Wednesday, Quaco; Thursday, Quao; Friday, Cuffee; Saturday, Quamin; Sunday, Quashee.

The ceremony

After a Ghanaian baby is born he or she is kept indoors for eight days. (The number of days varies through the different tribes) on the eighth day is the day of the naming ceremony, ‘Den to’. The first name received is called the Kra den or “soul name”, and is determined by the day of the week that the child was born. This is because Nyame (oun’-yah-may’) and Nyamewaa (oun’-yah-may’-wah), the Great God and the Great Goddess respectively, whom together constitute the Supreme Being in Ghanaian culture, placed seven of their children over the seven days of the week. The child also receives its formal name or good/ideal name, ‘Den pa’, on the eighth day. The formal name defines the function of the child in the world as it relates to his or her specific Ancestral Clan and his or her potential for manifesting wisdom and influence. The den pa carries the vibrations that will empower the individual to properly incorporate Divine Law and restore Divine balance throughout his or her life according to Ancestral protocol. Traditionally the naming ceremony begins and ends before sunrise. It is the father that has the responsibility of naming the child, thus the family comes together in the early morning at the father’s house. The Elders invoke Nyame (God), Nyamewaa (Goddess), and pour libation to Asaase Afua (Earth Mother/Goddess also called Asaase Yaa) the Abosom (Divinities, Forces of Nature) and the Nananom Nsamanfo (Honoured Ancestral Spirits) to assist with the proper naming of the child. After the name is acquired, the infant is given to an Elder from the father’s side of the family who announces the kra den and den pa to the family for the first time. There are two cups ritually utilized during the ceremony. One cup contains water and the other Nsa (strong drink). The Elder dips his index finger into the water and places it on the mouth of the infant saying, “When you say it is water, it is water.” He dips his index finger into the nsa and places it on the mouth of the infant saying, “When you say it is nsa, it is nsa.” This is repeated three times. This is done to instil within the infant a consciousness of morality-the necessity of always living in harmony with the truth for all of her/his life. After this is completed gifts are presented to the newborn, after which the remainder of the nsa in the bottle is shared with members of the community. The full name of the newborn is spoken to each member of the community, and each member sips some of the nsa as a show of respect for the child and as a gesture towards the newborn’s health. A meal is then shared by all followed by music & dancing – Azonto Style! 

60
pointandphotograph:

Another picture from Ghana, taken on my last day there. One of the other interns and I decided to take a trip to Madina Market- an hour on the trotro out of Accra, in sporadic rain showers. It was worth it though; the hustle and bustle of the market really made it feel alive, despite the weather.
Madina Market, Ghana.
1st August 2014.

pointandphotograph:

Another picture from Ghana, taken on my last day there. One of the other interns and I decided to take a trip to Madina Market- an hour on the trotro out of Accra, in sporadic rain showers. It was worth it though; the hustle and bustle of the market really made it feel alive, despite the weather.

Madina Market, Ghana.

1st August 2014.

44
pm-combs:

ENGAGEMENT READY❤️

pm-combs:

ENGAGEMENT READY❤️

107
ganyokoborlor:

JOLLOF IS LIFE (Typography animation by David Abbey-Thompson)Technical Details-33 frames (565 x 800)-0.20sec interval display time-0.70sec interval between last 3 frames (of final 4 frames)

ganyokoborlor:

JOLLOF IS LIFE (Typography animation by David Abbey-Thompson)

Technical Details
-33 frames (565 x 800)
-0.20sec interval display time
-0.70sec interval between last 3 frames (of final 4 frames)

THEME ©